Manufacturing

Manufacturing

Scroll down

Les Breuleux, Switzerland

The beauty and solitude of the Swiss Jura landscape is a perfect setting for the creation of exceptional timepieces.

Les Breuleux, Switzerland

Les Breuleux, Switzerland

The beauty and solitude of the Swiss Jura landscape is a perfect setting for the creation of exceptional timepieces.

HOROMETRIE S.A

Horometrie SA was established by Richard Mille and Dominique Guenat in 2001 in Les Breuleux, not far from the busy watchmaking centers La Chaux-de-Fonds and Le Locle. That novel joint venture between two friends was later enlarged to also include Montres Valgine, a company originally founded by the Guenat family more than a century before. Horometrie and Valgine would now combine their efforts and expertise in terms of the development, production and distribution of Richard Mille watches worldwide. A new part of the Richard Mille Group, a watch casemaking factory, ProArt SA, opened in April 2013.

HOROMETRIE S.A

PROART

ProArt, an ultra-contemporary 3,320 m2 building designed by the architectural agency Chavanne, represents yet another milestone in the ongoing development of the Richard Mille brand, further solidifying its future and providing full flexibility to product development and production.
Richard Mille watch cases, as well as a number of movement components, including baseplates, pushers, bridges and bracelet parts in precious metals, titanium and composites - are all created on this state of the art site - a truly exceptional factory for the creation of exceptional products.

PROART

PROART

ProArt, an ultra-contemporary 3,320 m2 building designed by the architectural agency Chavanne, represents yet another milestone in the ongoing development of the Richard Mille brand, further solidifying its future and providing full flexibility to product development and production.
Richard Mille watch cases, as well as a number of movement components, including baseplates, pushers, bridges and bracelet parts in precious metals, titanium and composites - are all created on this state of the art site - a truly exceptional factory for the creation of exceptional products.

CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY

With the environment as a fundamental concern, the Richard Mille watchmaking facility in Les Breuleux was the first in the Canton of Jura to be built utilizing geothermal heating and cooling systems.

CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY

TECHNIQUE & INNOVATION

The procedures for implementing new ideas and developments such as new materials and methods are major steps in the physical realization of innovative concepts in watchmaking. Behind the creation of every timepiece, many hours of calculations and research are required to ensure the perfection that clients expect and deserve.

TECHNIQUE & INNOVATION

TECHNIQUE & INNOVATION

The procedures for implementing new ideas and developments such as new materials and methods are major steps in the physical realization of innovative concepts in watchmaking. Behind the creation of every timepiece, many hours of calculations and research are required to ensure the perfection that clients expect and deserve.

DEVELOPMENT

When Richard Mille embarks on the development of a new creation, his procedure is uncompromising: at each key moment in the design process, when a choice has to be made, preference will inexorably be given to the solution that is technically the best, to the one that is most in tune with the concept being explored, independent of all other considerations, particularly those concerning financial ramifications.

DEVELOPMENT

EXTREME WATCHMAKING

‘Hand-crafted’ is the perfect term for describing the production process at Richard Mille. Every piece and part is unique, the work is executed by hand, five centimeters from the eye of the watchmaker. Although the parts for Richard Mille watches are made with the aid of the most modern and sophisticated machines that exist, with an accuracy of microns, this is only the first step of hundreds that are ultimately and completely reliant on the interaction of human hands, eyes and experience for the achievement of true perfection.

EXTREME WATCHMAKING

EXTREME WATCHMAKING

‘Hand-crafted’ is the perfect term for describing the production process at Richard Mille. Every piece and part is unique, the work is executed by hand, five centimeters from the eye of the watchmaker. Although the parts for Richard Mille watches are made with the aid of the most modern and sophisticated machines that exist, with an accuracy of microns, this is only the first step of hundreds that are ultimately and completely reliant on the interaction of human hands, eyes and experience for the achievement of true perfection.

FINISHING

The unique character and essence of a Richard Mille watch lies not only in its high mechanical complexity, visual design and ergonomic fit, but also the handcrafted finishing and polishing by specialists who imbue each part with perfection through the application of tremendous patience, keen eyesight and deft handwork. Based on a watchmaking tradition that goes back centuries, hand finishing makes each Richard Mille watch a unique piece with personal and individual care devoted to the slightest details. These myriad finishing operations are the very essence of a little-known art, hidden within the heart of the movement and the case of the watch, representing the excellence and quality of high-end watchmaking. A large number of Richard Mille parts such as screws, bridges, tourbillon cages, winding barrel covers, springs, hands and numerous other parts including the watch case are finished and decorated by hand. This is exactly the type of finishing that determines the essential qualities that particularly distinguish high-end watchmaking from the rest, details which an expert eye will be able to recognize immediately, able to identify each technique used with a glance of the eye. Many other microscopic parts are beautifully machined using state of the art technology. A Richard Mille timepiece distinguishes itself by such care devotion to finishing the smallest details in combination with a technological view of 21st century watchmaking.

FINISHING

QUALITY CONTROL

Each Richard Mille timepiece is subjected to stringent quality controls. Our experienced watchmakers control every spare part before it is assigned a place in inventory. From each titanium screw of the watchcase to the smallest parts of the movement, watchmakers first examine all spare parts closely with the naked eye to make sure there are no scratches. Following this, they are checked by a number of various machines with pre-programmed quality control criteria to ensure that each piece has been perfectly manufactured in accordance to the original calculations. A specialized data program tracks each of the spare part in a quality control process, assuring that all aspects of aesthetic and functional quality have been examined. Once the watch is assembled, its various functions are tested, separately and combined. Depending on the watch model, this might concern the correct changing of the date, chronograph functions, and power reserve indicators pertinent to each type. This work is executed in addition to the extensive and rigorous timing and water resistance controls that every Richard Mille watch must undergo. It takes at least 3 weeks to complete all of these stages. The final control testing assures that each timepiece runs perfectly and during this process each function of the watch will be tested 3 times. The specified power reserve will be tested to guarantee the watch has the correct power reserve capabilities. A great number of aesthetic criteria will be taken into consideration to ensure that the watch is beautifully finished; a number of these quality requirements are calculated to mere fractions of a millimeter. Mechanical watches may go through up to 50 or 60 different processes before the watch is considered to be as near to perfect as humanly possible before delivery.

QUALITY CONTROL

QUALITY CONTROL

Each Richard Mille timepiece is subjected to stringent quality controls. Our experienced watchmakers control every spare part before it is assigned a place in inventory. From each titanium screw of the watchcase to the smallest parts of the movement, watchmakers first examine all spare parts closely with the naked eye to make sure there are no scratches. Following this, they are checked by a number of various machines with pre-programmed quality control criteria to ensure that each piece has been perfectly manufactured in accordance to the original calculations. A specialized data program tracks each of the spare part in a quality control process, assuring that all aspects of aesthetic and functional quality have been examined. Once the watch is assembled, its various functions are tested, separately and combined. Depending on the watch model, this might concern the correct changing of the date, chronograph functions, and power reserve indicators pertinent to each type. This work is executed in addition to the extensive and rigorous timing and water resistance controls that every Richard Mille watch must undergo. It takes at least 3 weeks to complete all of these stages. The final control testing assures that each timepiece runs perfectly and during this process each function of the watch will be tested 3 times. The specified power reserve will be tested to guarantee the watch has the correct power reserve capabilities. A great number of aesthetic criteria will be taken into consideration to ensure that the watch is beautifully finished; a number of these quality requirements are calculated to mere fractions of a millimeter. Mechanical watches may go through up to 50 or 60 different processes before the watch is considered to be as near to perfect as humanly possible before delivery.

Ò